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On-Screen Inspiration . . . Beauty and the Beast

Agathe: . . . As punishment, the beautiful enchantress transformed the young prince into a hideous beast, and placed a powerful spell on the castle and all who lived there.

If he could learn to love another and earn their love in return by the time the last petal falls, the spell would be broken. If not, he would be doomed to remain a beast for all time. As the years passed, he fell into despair and lost all hope. For who could ever learn to love a beast?

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Beast: Your father . . . is a thief!

Belle: Liar!

Beast: He stole a rose.

Belle: [to the Beast] A life sentence for a rose?

Beast: [leaps down to her section of the tower, but remains hidden in the shadows] I received eternal damnation for one. I’m merely locking him away. Now, do you still wish to take your father’s place?

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[The Beast enters the dining room, sits down and sees another plate set up across from him.]

Beast: You’re making her dinner?

Lumière: Well, if this girl is the one who can break the spell, then maybe you can start by using dinner to charm her.

Beast: That’s the most ridiculous idea I’ve ever heard. Charm the prisoner.

Lumière: But you must try, Master. With every passing day, we become less human.

 

Sin has put the entire human race under the curse of existing in their basest, most animalistic nature. Only Christ, by His sacrificial love, can defeat the curse and set us free to be fully human, created in God’s image and restored to be the people He created us to be.

“But now that you have been set free from sin and have become slaves of God, the fruit you get leads to sanctification and its end, eternal life.” —Romans 6:22 (ESV)

Off Camera . . . with Producer Howard Kazanjian

Mastermedia CEO Dan Rupple talks with Howard Kazanjian, producer of Star Wars: Episode VI—Return of the Jedi and Raiders of the Lost Ark.

Dan: Thank you for being with us, Howard. Before you began to chart a course into the movie industry, what and when was the spark that drew you to this career?

Howard: The spark, as you call it, was my parents handing me their 8mm spring-wound camera at the age of 11. I was taken to the movie theaters at a very young age and was captivated by the idea of recreating a world of storytelling by visuals.

Dan: Transcending cultures, nations, and age, Star Wars has become the global folklore of the 21st Century. What do you think it is about this epic story that resonates so powerfully?

Howard: First and foremost, credit must be given to George Lucas because he created a new way of storytelling. We all grew up hearing fairy tales, but George created a new fairy tale for the screen.

Stepping “out of the box,” Star Wars combines traditional Hollywood filmmaking with fabulous elements and techniques of storytelling through exciting visuals, great music, sound, special effects, creatures, captivating characters, eye-catching sets, and tight editing. This was new-world technology with fast action. It was a new road to filmmaking that captured the imagination, first of America and then the world. Most important, it had story that didn’t end two hours later.

Dan: During your early years in the industry there were relatively few Christians working in the media. Now, thankfully, Christian media professionals are too numerous to count. What changes have you seen through the years in the Christian presence within the industry? And what changes have you seen in the media’s perception of the Christian community?

Howard: Today, there are more Christians working in the media. But media now has hundreds of thousands of employees—more than ever before. The industry has become even more secular, and I would say increasingly negative toward Christians. What we need is more Christians in the decision-making areas of our industry. We need Christians as attorneys, executives, agents, and those who can green-light projects.

Dan: Working within the mainstream film world, how does your faith inform your role as a producer?

Howard: My faith keeps me going. My faith is my hope for tomorrow. My faith is my rock.

Dan: Has the Christian community ever questioned why you produce mainstream, “secular” fare, as opposed to explicitly Christian films?

Howard: Christian films are rarely approved by studio heads. I choose my films rather than have them assigned to me. I am very selective of the films I work on and, hopefully, they are appropriate for family.

Dan: What advice would you have for the young Christian who feels a call to the film industry?

Howard: Be strong in your faith. Be tough, yet soft. Learn your craft well. Work hard and long hours. Shine for the Lord. This is not an easy road to travel. As you get to a certain level you may find that there are no executives who will agree with your thinking and push your project to the top.

Dan: Howard, your friends at Mastermedia are proud of who you are as a Christian, as a media professional and as an example of a follower of Christ within the media. We ask our entire Mastermedia community to continue to pray for you and your family. Thank you!

Your Dream . . . Worth the Wait!

Patrick Cavanaugh’s book, Spiritual Lives of the Great Composers, reveals intriguing details of George Frederick Handel’s life-changing experience composing The Messiah. By age 56 he was about to retire as a failure when a friend gave him a libretto of Scripture verses—and everything changed.

Cavanaugh writes, “Handel threw himself into writing and in a staggering stretch completed part one in only six days, part two in only nine, and part three in another six. He worked feverishly, driven by one overwhelming purpose.”

According to Cavanaugh, at one point he answered the door with tears streaming down his face and cried out, “I did think I did see all Heaven before me, and the great God himself.” He had just finished what would become known as the “Hallelujah” chorus.

Cavanaugh describes this amazing experience: “Handel completed an astounding 260 pages of orchestration in only twenty-four days. During that process, he didn’t leave his house, and friends often found him sobbing with emotion . . . . Some have considered it one of the greatest musical feats in history.”

Writer, speaker, and producer Phil Cooke reflects on this inspiring account in his blog . . . It was as if he had been waiting his entire life for that moment.

“Even Handel’s commercial successes were usually followed by financial disaster. He was attacked by the church and many at the time felt little reason to believe his talent was worthy of any kind of legacy—until The Messiah . . . .

“Out of a past that was uneven at best, the creation of Messiah was a burst of creativity driven by the remarkable passion of a man who glimpsed his one real purpose.”

Phil asks this penetrating question: “What’s that one moment you’ve been waiting for all your life? How many times have you thought about giving up?”

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