Tag: hollywood

Billy Graham’s Hollywood Star

He wasn’t a star, but a simple preacher of the Gospel . . . yet on October 15, 1989, the city of Hollywood honored Billy Graham with the 1,900th star on its legendary Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Mr. Graham was awarded the star for his work as a minister of the Gospel using radio, television and film. His star has a small, old-time microphone symbol, signifying his work in radio beginning in the early 1950s. 

Johnny Grant, honorary mayor of Hollywood and chairman of the Walk of Fame Committee, remarked in Billy Graham: God’s Ambassador, “I doubt there is anyone in Hollywood who has been seen, heard, or enjoyed by more people than Billy Graham.”

With characteristic grace and humility, Mr. Graham shifted the attention to Jesus Christ as he accepted the honor . . .

“My primary desire today in having my name inscribed upon this Walk of Fame is that God would receive the glory,” he said. “I hope someday somebody will come and say, ‘Who is Billy Graham? What did he stand for?’ Perhaps a child will ask his parents or grandparents, and they will tell him that he was not a celebrity, not a star, but a simple preacher of the Gospel. And that they might explain the Gospel to him, and that many might find Christ in that.” 

www.billygraham.org; Billy Graham Trivia

In the Room Where it Happens

By Dan Rupple

In the Broadway mega-hit Hamilton, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison are behind closed doors, deciding on foundational policies that would still have major ramifications today . . . and all behind closed doors.

On the outside stands the excluded Aaron Burr, bemoaning that he’s not in on the conversation. When George Washington asks, “What do you want, Burr?” Burr replies, “I wanna be in the room where it happens!”

“I wanna be in the room where it happens!”

To have our voice heard, for individuals to have the ability to speak into conversations that affect their lives, to be represented . . . all go to the heart of our democracy. However, in the media world—which consists of private for-profit corporations—many influential decisions are being made, and often only the loudest voices get “in the room where it happens.”

Second only to profits, perhaps the leading influencers that dictate what the world sees on its screens are the numerous, diverse voices representing many of the demographic threads of the American fabric. These voices speak for fragments of our culture divided by gender, race, political leanings, lifestyle, ethnic background, or other special interests. Some are large and some are small, but their objective is the same: to effectively urge, and often vehemently demand, that their factions be favorably reflected in TV and film characters and storylines.

What is our voice? . . .

  • Ours is an absent voice.

Why isn’t the Christian voice being heard? In a previous Median (February 17, 2017, The Church and Hollywood . . . in the Beginning), I chronicled how during the infancy of Hollywood, America’s Christian community was the deciding voice. But a few decades later, offended by what Hollywood was offering, people of faith pushed back their chairs, walked out of the room, and cocooned themselves in the sanctuary of our churches. The generations that followed were discouraged from entering the media business. As the church relinquished the responsibility of providing or supporting positive, life-affirming films, the secular film culture filled the void!

So for many years, the term Christian media professional became an oxymoron. The Christian light in Hollywood dimmed and was in danger of being extinguished. However, America’s largest people group—followers of Jesus Christ*—is all too often not “in the room where it happens!” The closest we get to the decision-making process is when we decide whether or not to turn on our TV. (*75% of Americans identify with a Christian religion, Gallup Dec 2015)

Christians will often complain that the “religious” people they see in movies or TV are either pious hypocrites or insane serial killers who claim that God spoke to them through their dog. Where is the portrayal of a compassionate, thoughtful, caring person of authentic faith?

There’s an old adage among screenwriters: “Write what you know.” So, what if the screenwriter doesn’t know any Christians? A good writer who does his research may be pleasantly surprised by what he finds. But a lazy (or perhaps already biased) writer may simply fall back on prevalent unflattering false portrayals . . . and the cycle continues.

From the screen, this image spreads throughout our culture, leaving many who are without a sincere Christ-follower in their lives to buy into the not-so-Christ-like stereotypes of Christians as portrayed in today’s media. Jesus called us to be the light of the world . . . where is light needed the most, but in the darkest of places? We are the salt of the earth . . . where does righteousness need to be preserved more than in a powerful, often godless, influencer?

  • Ours is an assumed voice.

“Seeing Peter and John about to go into the temple, [a man lame from birth] asked to receive alms . . . expecting to receive something from them.

“But Peter said, ‘I have no silver and gold, but what I do have I give to you. In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, rise up and walk!”’ (Acts 3)

As the lame man did with Peter and John, people often have an expectation of what they are going to get from a Christian. These expectations are usually based on preconceived assumptions. Some have a positive notion of a person of faith, much like this lame man did . . . that Christians are a generous, compassionate, giving people. But sadly, many have a much more negative perception of Christians, that we are a hypocritical, judgmental, mean-spirited group.

In the media world, the assumption adopted by many media leaders has been built by years of hearing a voice of anger bouncing off the pages of hate letters or the shouts of protest outside their office windows.

But what if a kindhearted, thoughtful Christian voice displaced this erroneous assumption? What if the Christian voice, like Peter’s and John’s, offered something so much better than protest . . . something that was reasonable, affirming, and beneficial to our culture, as well as their financial bottom line?

  • Ours is a needed voice.

Films are often promoted as “The Feel Good Movie of the Year.” These are films that touch our hearts, bring a smile to our faces, movies that make us cheer or shout with glee! Films whose happy endings conclude with scenes of redemption (Les Miserables), self-sacrifice (It’s a Wonderful Life), good triumphant over evil (Star Wars), standing courageously by your convictions (Chariots of Fire), “right” winning the day (High Noon), or that which was lost is found (Finding Nemo).

 Isn’t it interesting that all of these themes which so resonate with the human spirit are values of the Kingdom of God? It’s the way God wired us! These movies give us a glimpse of how the world was supposed to be! We are spiritually transported back to the reality of walking through a garden in the cool of the day, conversing with our Creator.

Films that inspire us to be our better selves are not only successful; think of the positive effect they have on our culture.

The destiny of the world is determined less by the battles that are lost and won than by the stories it loves and believes in.  —Harold Goddard, U.S. Educator

Entry into “the room where it happens” is earned through compelling creativity, excellence of craft and being a constant, genial, reasonable, beneficial voice.

Mastermedia has been and continues to be that kind of voice into the hearts of media’s decision makers. And we endeavor to expand our voice . . . to deserve our seat at the table . . . to always be “in the room where it happens!”

Storyboard: All Power is Given!

by Dan Rupple

Recently, accusations began to surface of the long history of sexual harassment and assaults perpetrated by film mogul Harvey Weinstein. Soon, he was joined by a growing number of other entertainers, journalists, and media executives who are fielding similar prior and on-going allegations.

As the scandal grew I was asked by a television interviewer, “What are we learning from these accusations?”

I responded with, “The first thing we need to understand is that all power is given; it’s a gift. When unrestrained power is bestowed upon a person, they have a choice to make. Do they use the power given them for good or for evil?”

I then explained that in the media world this evil use of power through sexual harassment, assault or sexual leveraging brings with it some added dynamics . . .

Power over individual lives.
The entertainment industry, a business overflowing with rejection and insecurity, cultivates a climate extremely susceptible to the fear and desperation of “this job could be your last.” One role can launch an entire career, just as fast as the loss of a role can place you in the “where-are-they-now” file. This culture can leave aspiring talent vulnerable to unintentionally being in harm’s way or, in the aftermath of an assault, maintaining a cloak of silence . . . especially when they’ve heard those threatening words, “You’ll never work in this town again!”

Power over the culture.
The immoral values, unethical actions, and hedonistic lifestyles of many of the fictional characters illuminated across our screens, can have a devastating and destructive impact on individuals and society at large when actually lived out behind the closed doors of real life. Characters who seek instant gratification at any cost, a life governed by an “if it feels good, do it” philosophy, the mockery of celibacy, monogamy and traditional marriage; all of these and more can have an eroding effect upon our entire culture.

Power over the abuser.
A final observation . . . it’s ironic that as these accounts of harassment within the media world dominate the global headlines, God is using the very medium through which these powerbrokers acquired their wealth and dominion to shine a light on their grievous personal sin. 

“Pilate said, ‘Don’t you realize I have power . . . ?’ Jesus answered, ‘You would have no power over me if it were not given to you from above.’” (John 19:10-11)

To close with a note of hope, an encouraging number of the talented artists I’ve had the pleasure to work with and executives I’ve had the honor to meet with, are wonderful, kindhearted, well-intentioned men and women who are trying to walk humbly and do good with the power, talents, and platforms they have been given. Furthermore, I would be remiss not to acknowledge the many stories emanating out of the studios and networks that inspire viewers with tales of heroism, courage, self-sacrifice, family, kindness, love, and good triumphing over evil.

Many of the discussions that Mastermedia is privileged to have with the world’s media leaders, are fueled by dialogue about the transformational power of the Spirit of God to live a good life and to impact culture with uplifting, values-based films.

In order for the media world’s good to triumph over the evil perpetrated by a small number of corrupt individuals, God would first have His people pray!

PRAY that God in His abundant love would bring healing and mend the brokenness in the shattered lives of the many victims of these devastating assaults.

PRAY that God would bring all the perpetrators to justice and repentance, and that they ultimately would find forgiveness and wholeness in God’s unfailing mercy and grace.

PRAY that this devastating season in media will lead to its greatest spiritual and ethical revival, ultimately impacting all of humankind . . . for good.

And as we pray, we would do well to also examine our own hearts and actions.

“He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the LORD require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?” (Micah 6:8)