Tag: film

China’s Box Office—Going Global

According to The Hollywood Reporter (THR), China, the second-largest market in the world for movie-goers, saw dramatic growth of 48.7 percent in 2015—and Hollywood is feeling the pressure!

As China’s economy has developed, they’re spending more and more money on entertainment. THR says, “By the end of 2017, China is expected to surpass North America—which reached a record $11 billion in box-office revenue in 2015—as the largest movie market in the world.”

This is global hollywood. Where Hollywood has always influenced the world’s media, now the world’s media is influencing Hollywood. Foreign box office is rapidly growing, and in China’s case, rivaling the U.S. box office. And foreign money is commonly funding American projects.

Pray that God will reveal Himself to the leaders of global media . . . some of whom are already listed on Mastermedia’s Media Leader Prayer Calendar.

“A Conversation” Appearing at a Theatre Near You

by Dan Rupple

Imagine my surprise when, after offering my three grandchildren the option of watching Star Wars during a cousin sleepover at our house, they passed on “The Force” and suggested instead, “Let’s have a conversation!” When I asked, “What’s a conversation?” our 6-year-old replied, “It’s when a lot of people get together and talk and talk and talk and talk about a lot of random things.”

Over the past decade, we’ve all witnessed the explosion of interactive communication triggered by the pervasive onslaught of digital media. And seemingly overnight, the most overheard word in the English language—especially among media professionals—became conversation.

Conferences that used to feature a lecture, talk, or teaching are now forums or symposiums inviting us to “join a larger conversation” taking place—one that allows our #hashtag voices to shape the narrative.

But is this phenomenon, in fact, new?

In Acts 17, we see that when the Apostle Paul entered into Athens, he immediately sought out the center of the cultural conversation. Where was it taking place? He found his answer in the Athenian “Starbucks” of yesteryear . . . the marketplace. And who was leading that conversation? The non-theistic philosophers who were shaping and guiding the public discourse toward the ideological “soup of the day.”

In today’s post-modern world, who is leading the Athenian center of conversations and where do we find them? In Plato’s time he observed it was “the storytellers that rule society.” Today, a fair cinematic spin would be that “the moviemakers rule society.” How often is the movie you saw at the local theater on Saturday night the topic of conversation in the office coffee room on Monday?

The stories shown on our screens inspire us, thrill us, scare us, amuse us, spark our imaginations, and fuel our conversations. We connect with movies and share them to connect with others. Different films spark unique kinds of dialogue. And independent films (like those shown at the Sundance Film Festival) provoke quite a different conversation than the films you might see at your local cineplex. Many independent films are putting a spotlight on a sober, more complex side of humanity. Frequently challenging, enlightening, illuminating, and occasionally breaking our hearts over injustice . . . all fodder for deeper, more introspective discussion.

But that isn’t to say that big-budget Hollywood fare—in all of its exciting, lighthearted escapism—doesn’t generate meaningful conversation long after the credits roll. Star Wars, for example, is chock-full of after-viewing allegorical topics, such as good vs. evil, the loss of a father, and a power outside of ourselves.

Movies, and the conversations they ignite, matter! The stories we watch can often provide divine on-ramps to a dialogue about the truth and grace of the gospel—relatable, understandable truths so crucial to our culture. Just as Paul entered the marketplace to tell the Athenians about the “unknown God,” we need to see the world as groping for a truth to live by, yet unknown to them, until someone is bold enough to enter into a cordial discourse about a God who knows and loves them.

This is the heart of the mission of Mastermedia: to intentionally and prayerfully build relationships, one conversation at a time, with the influential media makers, filmmakers, and artists of our day. And to appropriately infuse these discussions with the  life-changing truth about the greatest story ever told—the love of Jesus!

Afflicting the Comfortable . . . at Windrider

“We’re called as Christians to give ourselves away, and that’s what we’ve got to work out.” These profound words from veteran movie producer Ralph Winter challenged students and filmmakers participating in a Windrider Forum discussion at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. The panel was exploring the idea of “afflicting the comfortable” through thoughtfully crafted documentary films that may stimulate social action.

Winter, a Hollywood producer whose credits include blockbuster movies like X-Men and Star Trek, was asking, “How do we break out of [our natural tendency to want comfort] and discipline ourselves?” His insightful answer . . . “We’re called as Christians to give ourselves away.”

Craig Detweiler, professor of communications and director of the Center for Entertainment, Media and Culture at Pepperdine University, expressed his perspective this way: “Hollywood films comfort the afflicted—always happy, always a clean resolution, for the most part.

“Independent films afflict the comfortable. You come out feeling worse than when you entered. We don’t usually go to films for that. We don’t want to pay money to feel worse. But these are filmmakers with a prophetic gift who say, ‘This is what’s wrong with the world.’”

Detweiler says he comes to Sundance to cultivate empathy. “I come back here because I need to have my heart broken annually so I can go back to my comfort and work and minister out of that.

“That’s what the Windrider* experience is.”

*Mastermedia International is a sponsor of the Windrider Forum.