Tag: film

Afflicting the Comfortable . . . at Windrider

We’re called as Christians to give ourselves away, and that’s what we’ve got to work out.” These profound words from veteran movie producer Ralph Winter challenged students and filmmakers participating in a Windrider Forum discussion, a part of the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. The panel was exploring the idea of “afflicting the comfortable” through thoughtfully crafted documentary films that may stimulate social action.

Winter, a Hollywood producer whose credits include blockbuster movies like X-Men and Star Trek, was asking, “How do we break out of [our natural tendency to want comfort] and discipline ourselves?” His insightful answer . . . “We’re called as Christians to give ourselves away.”

Craig Detweiler, former professor of communications and director of the Center for Entertainment, Media and Culture at Pepperdine University, expressed his perspective this way:

“Hollywood films comfort the afflicted—always happy, always a clean resolution, for the most part.

“Independent films afflict the comfortable. You come out feeling worse that when you entered. We don’t usually go to films for that. We don’t want to pay money to feel worse. But these are filmmakers with a prophetic gift who say, ‘This is what’s wrong with the world.’”

Detweiler says he comes to Sundance to cultivate empathy. “I come back here because I need to have my heart broken annually so I can go back to my comfort and work and minister out of that. That’s what the Windrider experience is.”

Dan Rupple, CEO of Mastermedia International, has partnered with the Windrider Forum at Sundance for 13 years, and Mastermedia is now a sponsor at Windrider.

When asked why it is important for Mastermedia to have a presence at Sundance and Windrider, Dan explained . . .

Robert Redford started the Sundance Film Festival to be a showcase for independent films that would never have the chance to be shown in theaters. Now 46,000 people come from all over the world. Hollywood executives come from all the major film studios looking for their next hit, and it’s a great opportunity for Mastermedia to connect with them.

Sundance is the launch pad for the talent of tomorrow . . . creatives, directors, writers, actors. For Mastermedia, it’s an opportunity to build a relationship and make a connection with someone very early in their career. It’s a chance to start a dialog, a conversation. The Sundance winner of today is the Oscar winner of tomorrow.

Our missional focus at Sundance is making connections that I can then go home and follow up with. This is often the beginning of trust relationships with these key contacts.

Paul, in the book of Acts, entered the marketplace in Athens and entered into the conversations they were having day after day about current ideologies . . . and that’s what we do at Sundance.

Peggy Rupple has served as Associate Director of the Windrider Forum for the past 14 years. Mastermedia International is a sponsor of the Windrider Forum.

On-Screen Inspiration . . . in Toy Story 3

Toy Story 3

Deus ex machina—“god of the machine”—an unexpected power (the hand of god) saving a seemingly hopeless situation, especially as a device in a play.

Toward the end of Toy Story 3, an edge-of-your-seat scene occurs of a thrilling salvation from a hopeless situation—the quintessential “deus ex machina.”

Woody, Buzz, and the gang are trapped in the back of a trash truck. As the truck deposits its load at a landfill, the toys find themselves on a conveyor belt heading for certain death in the flames of the incinerator.

The toys grasp each others’ hands as they resign themselves to their fate . . .

Suddenly, from far above, an industrial claw reaches down and raises them out of the fiery pit.

“He drew me up from the pit of destruction, out of the miry bog, and set my feet upon a rock, making my steps secure.” —Psalm 40:2

Laus Deo. “Praise be to God.”

What’s your most inspiring film scene—and why? Let us know at feedback@mastermediaintl.org.

Bridge Builders

by Dan Rupple

In the 1989 Disney classic The Little Mermaid, the mermaid princess Ariel is dissatisfied with her underwater life. Spotting a reflection at the bottom of the ocean, a sunken fork provides Ariel a glimpse into a different world . . . a human world.

As she fantasizes about what it might be like “up there,” she longs to be “part of their world.” But it’s not until her father, King Triton, provides a way—a “bridge”—that she is able to cross over into a life above the sea.

We’ve all seen movies that introduced us to lands we’ve never known or human struggles we’ve never experienced. I’ve seen so many films, especially documentaries at the Sundance Film Festival, that have provided a “bridge” of understanding to a world of which I was previously unaware. These cinematic bridges made a new connection possible for me.

But despite this digital age of unprecedented global connectivity, as a culture we seem to be more divided than ever before. Movies may serve as bridges, allowing us to cinematically travel across the great divide from the known to the unknown. But oh how we need far more kinds of bridges built than movies can ever provide . . . bridges that connect two things that are presently disconnected, bridges that make a way where there wasn’t a way before!

Deep in the heart of God resides a bridge builder. Long before mankind put an insurmountable divide between himself and God, the Lord had conceived His plan to provide a way—a bridge—for mankind to cross back over the divide, reuniting  mankind to his Creator.

God calls us to be bridge builders as well.

Throughout the Scriptures, we see God’s people creating bridges that didn’t previously exist. Jesus with the Samaritan woman at the well creates a bridge between ethnicities and genders (John 4). The Apostle Peter creates a bridge between Jew and Gentile when he enters the home of Cornelius (Acts 10). And the Apostle Paul crosses the divide between Jew and Roman when he appeals to Caesar (Acts 25).

I was asked recently, “If Mastermedia had a symbol, what would it be?” Without hesitation I answered, “A bridge.” Our mission is to bridge the gap between the Christian audience and the media producers who fill our screens, to connect the Christian community with the Hollywood community, and to create a respectful dialog about faith with the secular media professional. These are the divides that God has called us to bridge.

To whom has God asked you to build a bridge?