Tag: culture

The Media Land of Opportunity!

by Dan Rupple, Mastermedia CEO


160712 eMedianhollywoodsign1
A few weeks ago, I was speaking to 25 Christian university film students who were visiting Hollywood. One young man asked me the all-too-familiar question, “How do I get into the business?” My standard answer a dozen years ago was, “Get yourself to Hollywood or New York and build as many relationships as you can. Then begin the arduous task of knocking on the doors of the five or six studios and the four TV networks, and then visit as many production companies as will let you into their lobbies.”

All part of making the rounds to the Hollywood powerbrokers—the men and women who create and control what the world will and won’t see on our screens. And if there weren’t any openings, you had few alternatives. They were the only game in town!

Still a good strategy. These traditional media companies continue to wield a powerful sword of influence. But no longer are they the only game in town . . . not by a long shot!

The digital explosion has flung the doors of opportunity wide open. With the flood of new digital platforms, the rise of independent film festivals dotting the map, and vast international audiences racing to the box office, the possibilities are limitless for the next talented Spielberg “wannabe.”

Supply and Demand
What created all of these new opportunities? Innumerable channels, websites, streaming companies, digital platforms, and expanded global audiences—all of which sparked an insatiable demand for content to fill the world’s screens in our new “screen dependent” culture.

According to an internet analyst at Morgan Stanley, in 2015 Americans spent 7 hours 44 minutes a day gazing into a screen. Assuming we sleep the national average of 6.8 hours a night, 43 percent of our waking life we are engaged in the virtual world—and disengaged (at least partially) from the real world.

Today the influence of this expanded media landscape has soared to an all-time high. To apply a digital-age paraphrase to Plato’s statement regarding the influence of storytellers, “Whoever controls the ‘screens,’ controls the culture!”

Walking through Open Doors
As today’s generation navigates this wild media frontier, it often finds itself stumbling in the dark, trying to make sense of a fallen world, and searching for answers to the big questions in life. Undoubtedly, our greatest impact will be offering hope and a solution for the spiritual hunger of these emerging cinematic voices . . . leading them, through intentional relationship, to “the way, the truth and the life.” This has been—and always will be—the mission of Mastermedia!

End of Wonderment in the Information Age

 

by Dan Rupple

 

Liam arm around Zayden (002)Growing up in the shadows of Disneyland, throughout my childhood I visited the Magic Kingdom two or three times every year. The absolute wonder engendered by my first visits filled my imagination for months afterwards. My amazement faded over time as the magic became familiar and predictable.

Twenty-some years later, I became a father. As I took my kids through those colorful gates and raced towards “Pirates of the Caribbean,” the excitement of my own childhood returned. Seeing Disneyland afresh through my kids’ eyes, I was reminded of the wonder that captivated me as a child.

I even welcomed with gladness that insidious repetitive song, “It’s a Small World After All!” As the boat turned the corner into each new land, the charm of the tune crept back into my head, resulting in my unbridled, at-the-top-of-my-lungs vocal stylings.

Another twenty-some years later, I returned once again with my grandkids. A whole new generation of wonder was launched. Wonder is a precious gift from the God of all creativity.

But in this age of information, where the answer to every question we ponder is just a click away, is wonder doomed to extinction? After all, if I wonder when—in his head-first flight towards his feast—does a mosquito turn his body to land his rear-end stinger deep into my arm, Google’s answer is immediately displayed on my omnipresent smart phone.

What if I wonder who was the first person to think it was a good idea to drink whatever came out of a cow’s udder?

Wikipedia doesn’t leave time for the milk to sour before I know it was the Central Europeans about 7,500 years ago (although I believe that the Bible would suggest that the “land of milk and honey” knew about milk much earlier).

The kick-off question that sparks the story of most writers is “What if . . . ?” That question is interchangeable with “I wonder what would happen if . . .”

Wonder ignites imagination, which finds its expression in creativity. We must pause every now and then to look to creation with wonder. Wonder about the answers to the big questions in life.

Let’s never lose the WONDERment of our childhood.

The heavens declare the glory of God, and the sky above proclaims his handiwork (Psalm 19:1).

 

The Power of Storytelling

by Ralph Winter, Producer (Captive, X-Men)


 

ralph winterStorytelling—it’s all around us. It’s in a courtroom, it’s in politics, it’s in our business, it’s in religion. It’s history. It’s what we’ve done around the campfires in teaching younger generations about life through stories. It’s cultural. It’s what we do at dinner when we have friends come over. It’s in movies and TV and social media. It’s in Instagram. The power and persuasiveness is front and center, and the best story wins.

At Sundance in January there was a fantastic film that will dominate the Oscars this next year. It’s called Birth of a Nation, the story of Nat Turner who led the slave rebellion of 1831. There were 1500 people in Eccles Theater standing and applauding and in tears at the end of this movie. And the director, Nate Parker, a strong Christian, stood up and told why he made the movie. He turned down an offer from Netflix for $20 million and took an offer of less money from Searchlight Pictures so he could stimulate dialogue about the content of the movie in community centers, churches, and theaters. It’s a pretty interesting, brave, and courageous choice in today’s market.

Sometimes the kind of things we do are not even on the faith community radar—but Mastermedia is there to support and understand what’s going on. I spend about 8-9 months a year on the road away from my family, and it’s people who pray for me and support me who keep me going. People like Buster [Holmes] and other friends, like my wife and my church community . . . people who hold me up while I’m doing this at a great distance, trying to make movies that have significance.

That’s one of the reasons to encourage and care for the filmmakers among us who are really “prophets” of the culture. In his book, Culture Care, my friend Makoto Fujimura says that believers who work in media walk in two different cultures—the secular and the faith community. They need encouragement, prayer, and people who understand what they’re going through as they prophetically try to show what the future is about.

In some ways, these filmmakers are like missionaries. They’re learning a new language and a new culture, and their values are different as they walk the border between two cultures. Let’s encourage our filmmakers as they’re doing that and being the prophets for this generation.