On-Screen Inspiration

In the second film of the Lord of the Rings trilogy, “The Two Towers,” after Frodo and Samwise Gamgee had been taken prisoner, sent to the ruined city of Osgiliath, then narrowly escaped being captured by Saurons minions, Frodo begins to lose hope. He is ready to give up, thinking he can never finish the quest of destroying the One Ring in Mordor.

Sam encourages his dear friend in this scene from the movie . . .

Frodo: I can’t do this Sam.

Samwise Gamgee: I know. It’s all wrong. By rights we shouldn’t even be here. But we are. It’s like in the great stories, Mr. Frodo. The ones that really mattered. Full of darkness and danger, they were. And sometimes you didn’t want to know the end. Because how could the end be happy? How could the world go back to the way it was when so much bad had happened?

But in the end, it’s only a passing thing, this shadow. Even darkness must pass. A new day will come. And when the sun shines it will shine out the clearer. Those were the stories that stayed with you . . . that meant something, even if you were too small to understand why.  

But I think, Mr. Frodo, I do understand. I know now. Folk in those stories had lots of chances of turning back, only they didn’t. They kept going. Because they were holding onto something.

Frodo: What are we holding onto Sam?

Sam: That there’s some good in this world, Mr. Frodo . . . and it’s worth fighting for.

In the book of 1 Samuel, David is on the run, overcome with fear, knowing that King Saul is out to kill him. Jonathan goes to speak words of encouragement to his friend . . .

“David saw that Saul had come out to seek his life. David was in the wilderness of Ziph at Horesh. And Jonathan, Saul’s son, rose and went to David at Horesh, and encouraged him in God. And he said to him, ‘Do not fear, for the hand of Saul my father shall not find you. You shall be king over Israel, and I shall be next to you.’” (1 Sam. 23:15-17)

It’s the true friend who encourages us in the midst of the most difficult part of life’s journey. “Therefore encourage one another with these words.” (1 Thessalonians 4:18)

What’s your most inspiring film scene? Why? Let us know at feedback@mastermediaintl.org

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Author: thomas

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On-Screen Inspiration

Schindler's List 2In a climactic scene at the close of the film, Schindler’s List, Oskar Schindler prepares to flee from the Allies after the Nazis are defeated. The Jewish survivors he has saved want to express to Schindler that by saving them, he has saved humanity. They give Schindler a ring made from their gold fillings, engraved with a quotation from the Talmud . . . “Whoever saves one life saves the world entire.”

Understanding the gravity of his actions, Schindler is moved with regret . . .

Oskar Schindler: I could have got more. I could have got more, I don’t know. If I just . . . I could have got more.

Itzhak Stern: Oskar, there are 1,100 people who are alive because of you. Look at them.

Oskar Schindler: If I had made more money. I threw away so much money. [laughs, then gets teary-eyed] You have no idea. If I just . . .

Itzhak Stern: There will be generations because of you.

Oskar Schindler: I didn’t do enough.

Itzhak Stern: You did so much.

Oskar Schindler: This car. Goeth would have bought this car. Why did I keep the car? Ten people right there. Ten people. Ten more people. This pin . . . two people. This is gold. Two people. He would have given me two more, at least one. One more person. A person, Stern, for this. [starts crying] I could have got one more person, and I didn’t! I — I — I didn’t!

This scene inspires deep introspection . . . one reflective response might be, “As I near the end of my life, will my heart be at peace with the assurance that I gave my all for the cause of Christ? Or will my heart be troubled with regret . . . ‘I could’ve done more!’”

What’s your most inspiring/moving film scene? Let us know at feedback@mastermediaintl.org.

Author: thomas

Comments are closed.