Compassionate Responses to Harmful Worldviews

   arts3-this-one  Artists are often the barometers of society, and by analyzing the worldviews embedded in their works we can learn a great deal about how to address the modern mind more effectively . . . . When the only form of cultural commentary Christians offer is moral condemnation, no wonder we come across to non-believers as angry and scolding.

     Our first response to the great works of human culture—whether in art or technology or economic productivity—should be to celebrate them as reflections of God’s own creativity.

     And even when we analyze where they go wrong, it should be in a spirit of love . . . [Francis] Schaeffer . . . even when raising serious criticisms . . . expressed a burning compassion for people caught in the trap of false and harmful worldviews. When describing the pessimism and nihilism expressed in so many movies, paintings, and popular songs, he demonstrated profound empathy for those actually living in such despair.

     These works of art “are the expression of men who are struggling with their appalling lostness,” he wrote. “Dare we laugh at such things? Dare we feel superior when we view their tortured expressions in their art?” The men and women who produce these things “are dying while they live; yet where is our compassion for them?”          

     Today, Christian activists are quick to organize a boycott or pressure a politician to de-fund some artistic group, and these strategies have their place. But how many reach out to the artists with compassion? How many do the hard work of crafting real answers to the questions they are raising? How many cry to God on behalf of people struggling in the coils of false worldviews?

[Crossway Books, p. 57]