Category: The Median

Compassionate Responses to Harmful Worldviews

   arts3-this-one  Artists are often the barometers of society, and by analyzing the worldviews embedded in their works we can learn a great deal about how to address the modern mind more effectively . . . . When the only form of cultural commentary Christians offer is moral condemnation, no wonder we come across to non-believers as angry and scolding.

     Our first response to the great works of human culture—whether in art or technology or economic productivity—should be to celebrate them as reflections of God’s own creativity.

     And even when we analyze where they go wrong, it should be in a spirit of love . . . [Francis] Schaeffer . . . even when raising serious criticisms . . . expressed a burning compassion for people caught in the trap of false and harmful worldviews. When describing the pessimism and nihilism expressed in so many movies, paintings, and popular songs, he demonstrated profound empathy for those actually living in such despair.

     These works of art “are the expression of men who are struggling with their appalling lostness,” he wrote. “Dare we laugh at such things? Dare we feel superior when we view their tortured expressions in their art?” The men and women who produce these things “are dying while they live; yet where is our compassion for them?”          

     Today, Christian activists are quick to organize a boycott or pressure a politician to de-fund some artistic group, and these strategies have their place. But how many reach out to the artists with compassion? How many do the hard work of crafting real answers to the questions they are raising? How many cry to God on behalf of people struggling in the coils of false worldviews?

[Crossway Books, p. 57]

 

Off Camera . . . with Todd Komarnicki

SullyMastermedia CEO Dan Rupple chats with Todd Komarnicki, producer of Elf and screenwriter of the soon-to-be released Sully—a biographical drama about Captain “Sully” Sullenberger who glided his disabled plane onto the frigid waters of the Hudson River, saving the lives of all 155 aboard.


 

Dan: Todd, when I think about Christian believers who have made a significant impact within the film world, while maintaining a faithful witness for Christ, you quickly come to mind. I am grateful to call you, not only a dear friend of Mastermedia, but a personal friend of mine.

Todd: My gratitude for Mastermedia extends from my first coffee with Larry Poland, to my latest prayer time with you and your colleagues and my staff in New York City. I am humbled and so grateful for all the love that has been bestowed upon me by your beautiful souls.

Dan: You wrote the screenplay for a major movie opening September 9th, Sully, directed by Clint Eastwood and starring Tom Hanks. That’s some pretty rare air in terms of talent. Can you give us a glimpse into your journey taking Sully from page to screen?

Todd: When adapting a true story it all starts with spending time with the real-life hero. The bulk of my adaptations have centered around people long dead, so it was an incredible boon to the process that I could have exclusive and vulnerable time with Sully himself. By “memorizing” as much of Sully himself that I could, I had a huge running start when I actually started going to script. I could see the man not as an abstract character, but as a real human being, making real heroic choices, in real time.

Dan: Integrating your faith with your career can be a challenge. Can you think of a time when your faith presented an obstacle or perhaps threatened your career?

Todd: I’ve never seen my faith as a threat to anything, except the darkness. I don’t consider anyone in the movie business as the gatekeeper of my destiny. That’s in the Lord’s hands. Perhaps certain jobs didn’t fall my way over the years, but I never perceived it as having anything to do with being a Christian. I cling to Romans 8:28 daily, and trust that God’s plan is the only plan worth investing in. After nearly thirty years in the business, I am certain that I am still here only by the grace of God. And that gives me deep and abiding peace as I do my work.

Dan: How about a time when you were ushered through a difficult time and it had the fingerprints of God all over it?

Todd: My father always used to say, “Expect to see Him.” That curiosity and openness to seeing the Holy Spirit at work everywhere is something that I inherited from him. So I see God’s fingerprints constantly. Mostly in the sense that I feel held in the palm of his hand. And I can see his fingerprints anytime I just open my eyes.

Dan: Todd, thank you for sharing your heart with us. All of us within the Mastermedia community will continue praying for God’s hand upon your career, your family and your life.

Outtakes . . . from “iGods”

Excerpt from the book iGods: How Technology Shapes our Spiritual and Social Lives
by Craig Detweiler, Ph.D., Professor of Communication, Pepperdine University

The triumph of Google raises key questions of authority. Who decides what matters? Will God still serve as a norm when our questions are answered by “Googling”?

Arguments about facts can be sorted out at the touch of a button. Does “I saw it on Google” become a twenty-first century equivalent to “God said it, I believe it, and that settles it”?

“Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you.” —Matthew 7:7

Seeking has always been an essential (and costly) part of the Christian journey. But search engines make seeking seem like such a quick and immediate process because the complexities are completely hidden.

So how might the surrender of our search function alter our hearts and minds? If Google seems to give us what we want, will we build in enough time and perspective to even consider what we need?

I wonder what happens when we outsource searching. How do we decide what matters and what to pay attention to?

How do you decide? Share your approach at feedback@mastermediaintl.org.