Category: The Median

Positive Cultural Change . . . through Media

familytvinfluenceHow the West Really Lost God, by leading cultural critic Mary Eberstadt, presents a powerful new theory about why religion has declined in the Western world.

Prevailing wisdom has suggested that the decline of religion brought about the demise of the family. But Ms. Eberstadt turns this logic around with her impressive body of research that shows the reverse has also been true: the decline of the family has further undermined Christianity itself. And most believers have no idea how to stop it from happening.

If Ms. Eberstadt’s theory is true, faith and family go together, and the decline of both may be having an adverse effect on society. It makes sense, as well, to note that our media saturated culture plays a part in this . . . exposing us every day to media content, both good and bad.

Never before in human history has such a wide and diverse number of men and women wielded such awesome and continuing influence over the global populace as do the leaders of electronic media and social media.

The Church’s responsibility is to pray for these leaders. Theirs is to decide whether or not to allow Him to work in and through them for great, pure, and noble purposes.

Some companies are beginning to take this connection of faith, families, and media seriously    . . . like Variety magazine, whose popular event, PURPOSE: The Family Entertainment & Faith-Based Summit, is dedicated to stimulating family entertainment and faith-based programming.

Something Beautiful

kathie-lee-captionWhen Kathie Lee Gifford was 12 years old, her life changed forever. “I came home to see my mother and sister in our living room, sobbing in front of the television.” They had been watching a Billy Graham crusade and both had come to Christ.

In her March 2016 interview with Christianity Today (CT), Kathie shared how, a few months later, she went to see the Billy Graham movie The Restless Ones. “As I watched . . . I sensed God saying deep in my spirit, ‘Kathie, I love you. If you’ll trust me, I’ll make something beautiful out of your life.’” That day, in a movie theater, Kathie Lee gave her life to Christ.

Kathie’s journey as a believer in entertainment has not been without adversity. In the CT interview she shared that when vicious attacks and false accusations were hurled at her in the tabloids, “Frank and I both stopped watching TV and reading the papers. We focused on the Word of God. I chose to read what God said about us, not what the world said.”

And when Christians asked, “How can you say you’re a Christian and be in Hollywood?” she responded with, “How could I be in Hollywood and not be a Christian? How could I put up with the work and rejection without the security of God’s faithfulness?”

But Kathie Lee never felt pressured to downplay or hide her faith, even in the entertainment industry. “That doesn’t mean I didn’t struggle, make mistakes, or break God’s heart on occasion,” she says. “But the story of my life—and I dare say any Christian’s life—is not the story of my faithfulness to God but of his faithfulness to me.”

Having lost her father, her husband, and many others, Kathie is sometimes tempted to lose heart. She says, “It’s overwhelming at times, since the world is so dark and so void of God’s Spirit.” But when she reads in Scripture, “Let us not be weary in well doing” (Gal. 6:9, KJV) she prays, “Okay, Lord, you’re going to have to help me be strong. You’re going to have to help me with inspiration. You’re going to have to help me keep going.”

Kathie Lee’s heartfelt, inspiring challenge . . . “The Devil would have us give up. The Devil would have us stop sharing the Word. He would have us stop giving hope to the hopeless.

“And we can’t fall for that. As much as we long for a different world, we have to stay in this one for now. It’s up to us to make an impact for Christ until he comes or until he takes us.

“The words God spoke to me 50 years ago are just as true today, and for every moment I have left, I will trust him to work his beautiful plan for me.”

Nourished by Story

Excerpts from “The Nourishment Business,” by children’s author John R. Erickson


blue-bloods-w-caption

My mother, Anna Beth Erickson, was an excellent cook . . . . She regarded cooking as more than drudgery and more than a process of blending ingredients and spices into palatable concoctions. In her view, there was no job more important than monitoring the source of her family’s food supply and tending to its preparation.

She also recognized that there was a spiritual dimension to eating. We took our evening meals together as a family. For that one hour, we became more than individuals racing off to meetings and school events. We were the Erickson family. We said grace together, ate in a mannerly fashion, and talked.

Mother was a nutritionist, a student of the science of wellness and wellbeing—the chemistry of Life. She understood that what we eat, and how we eat, contributes substantially to who we are, both physically and spiritually.

I often compare what I do with what my mother did. There is a spiritual dimension to storytelling that equates to the chemistry of food preparation. A good story satisfies the appetite for entertainment, but it can also reveal truth, structure, justice, humor, and beauty, and when that occurs, a writer has the opportunity to make readers better than they were before.

People need good stories just as they need wholesome food and clean water. Stories that enumerate chaos and absurdity leave us weaker and diminished. Those that reveal beauty and meaning in human experience nourish the soul.

We who were given the talent to write (or compose music or make movies) should use our gifts to strengthen the people who use our products. Like humble cooks, we’re in the nourishment business, and that changes the focus of art from Me to Us.

“Us” is who we are as a people, the human family. In this country we share a core of traditions and beliefs that we call “civilization.” For at least 3,000 years, philosophers, prophets, and preachers have told us we should preserve it, protect it, and pass it down to the next generation.

The Founders of our nation accepted this as common sense. So did Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Luther, Bach, and C. S. Lewis. It used to be taught in great universities, and I hope it still is.

Are we making our readers stronger or weaker, better or worse? That’s a question that anyone in the nourishment business should be asking every day.

*Posted July 23, 2016 at https://world.wng.org/2016/07/the_nourishment_business